“Print beef-free banknotes”: Hindu group to Australian reserve bank

Small amounts of tallow, which is rendered from beef or mutton fat, are used in the production of polymer currency as a 'slip agent' to provide anti-static properties

A Hindu organisation has urged the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) to print beef-free banknotes after it was revealed that cow fat is used in the production of the $20 and $100 notes.

Rajan Zed, President of the Universal Society of Hinduism a religious organisation headquartered in Nevada of United States, wrote a letter to the RBA asking them to “show respect to the feelings of Hindus and print banknotes which did not use beef as an ingredient”.

Newly designed banknotes are being introduced in the country, with the newly-printed notes of $5, $10, and $50 already in circulation, according to the Daily Mail. Reports stated the RBA is planning to introduce new notes of $20 and $100 in 2019 and 2020 too.

Small amounts of tallow, which is rendered from beef or mutton fat, are used in the production of polymer currency as a ‘slip agent’ to provide anti-static properties. Zed has requested the RBA to take the issue seriously as it is “highly insensitive on the part of the bank to continue with reportedly beef-laced banknotes”.

‘The RBA should have been wise and literate enough to look into the religious sensitivities of its consumers before investing so much money and effort into the production of polymer banknotes,’ he told according to the report by Daily Mail

Beef laced banknotes australia

Vegans have also expressed anger at tallow being used in banknotes before.
Last year, a similar row had erupted after the Reserve Bank of Australia confirmed that banknotes have around one per cent of the animal by-product.

This polymer base is manufactured by an Australian company called CCL Secure, which exports it in the form of granules that are then melted to form the currency sheets. 

The company said in a statement at the time that a supplier included the ingredient and they would ‘not knowingly add any animal ingredients into our products.’